Author Topic: Rangemaster training  (Read 958 times)

jhutch

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Rangemaster training
« on: April 29, 2016, 08:12:16 PM »
After reading the ACLDN Journal this month, I'm considering attending next year's Rangemaster training in Little Rock, AK.

http://rangemaster.com/2017-tactical-conference/

Has anyone here taken this training?  The 2016 agenda looked really great and the list of trainers was impressive.  The 2017 agenda is not yet out.

Anyone else considering going?  It's really reasonably priced at $355 for 3 days.
Hutch
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jhutch

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Re: Rangemaster training
« Reply #1 on: May 17, 2016, 06:40:10 PM »
I signed up, perhaps looking forward to that will make time slow down somewhat... the days have been flying by and it just keeps accelerating.
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Major Malfunction

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Re: Rangemaster training
« Reply #2 on: May 18, 2016, 06:40:21 AM »
I signed up, perhaps looking forward to that will make time slow down somewhat... the days have been flying by and it just keeps accelerating.

Boy, ain't THAT the truth!

When my Dad was dying he kept saying, "It all happened so fast." At the time I thought he was talking about his sudden decline, but after some reflection, I think he might have been referring to his entire 85 years. It makes one think.
Security cannot be achieved at the cost of freedom.

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jhutch

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Re: Rangemaster training
« Reply #3 on: December 21, 2016, 04:37:30 PM »
Only 80 some-odd days until Rangemaster Tac-Con-17.  Recently Tom Givens posted the 3-day schedule (shown below).  I'm looking forward to this!
Hutch

FRIDAY
Classrooms

Skip Gochenour, 8am-10am, Your Training Decisions to Handle Problem #1 Can Negatively Impact Your Ability to Deal with Problem #2

Erik Pakeiser, 8am-Noon, Developing a Force on Force Training Program

Chuck Haggard, 8am-10am, OC/Pepper Spray Use and Deployment

Steve Moses, 10am to Noon, Setting Up Church Security Details

Tom Givens, 10am-Noon, Active Shooters and Your Response

Lee Weems, 1pm-3pm, Police/Citizen Contacts

John Murphy, 1pm-5pm, Street Encounter Skills

Tom Givens, 1pm-3pm, Defining the Threat

John Farnam, 3pm-5pm, Let’s Not Shoot Ourselves, Gun Accidents

MED BAY
Fletch Fuller, 10am-Noon, Keep Your Piece, Handgun Retention

Caleb Causey, 1pm-3pm, Tactical Medicine for EDC

PAPER RANGE (Live Fire)
John Hearne, 8am-Noon, Building Handgun Skills 200 rounds

Spencer Keepers, 1pm to 4pm, AIWB Skills, 200 rounds

Chuck Haggard, 4pm-5pm, Ammo Demonstration in Ballistic Gel

Shoot House

John Holschen/Gary Greco, 1pm to 5pm, Scenario Based Exercises

Covered Pistol Range
Tactical Pistol Match, all day

SATURDAY

Classrooms
Greg Ellifritz, 8am to 10am, Recognizing, Detecting, and Neutralizing the Terrorist Bomber

Tiffany Johnson, 8am-10am, Classroom Presentation Skills for Trainers

Claude Werner, 8am to 10am, STOPP Strategy, Tactics, and Options for Personal Protection

Lee Weems, 10am to Noon, Police/Citizen Contacts

Paul Martin, 10am to Noon, “Preparing People For Things Other Than Violence (OTV): How to Incorporate Preparedness Training Into Your Defensive Force Course Curricula”

Tom Givens, 10am to Noon, Active Shooters and Your Response

Emanuel Kapelsohn, 1pm-3pm, Lessons Learned from Use of Force Cases

William Aprill, 1pm to 5pm, Violent Crime, Violent Acts and Violent Actors

Wayne Dobbs and Darryl Bolke, 1pm to 3pm, What’s Really Important? Skills for Winning Gunfights

Andrew Branca, 3pm-5pm, Legal Issues in the Use of Force


MED BAY
Cecil Burch, 8am to 10am, Just Enough Ju-Jitsu

Paul Sharp, 10am to Noon, Defeating Multiple Opponents

Chris Perriatt, 1pm to 5pm, Realities of Close Quarter Combat, Hands-On

Paper Range (Live Fire)
Spencer Keepers, 8am to Noon, AIWB Skills 200 rounds

Chuck Haggard, 1pm-3pm, Small Handguns, 150 rounds

Wayne Dobbs and Darryl Bolke, 3pm to 5pm, What Really Matters? Skills to Win Gunfights- follow up to classroom block, 150 rounds

Shoot House
Gary Greco and John Holschen, 8am to Noon, Scenario Based Exercises

Craig Douglas, “Southnarc”, 1pm to 4pm, Experiential Learning Lab

Covered Pistol Range
Tactical Pistol Match, all day

SUNDAY

Classrooms
Skip Gochenour, 8am to 10am, Your Training Decisions to Handle Problem #1 can Have a Negative Impact on Your Ability to Handle Problem #2

Tom Givens, 8am-10am, Defining the Threat

John Murphy, 8am to Noon, Street Encounter Skills

Steve Moses, 10am to Noon, Setting Up a Church Security Detail

Kevin Davis, 10am to Noon, Preparing and Training for the Fight

Massad Ayoob and Marty Hayes, 1pm to 4pm, The Firearms Instructor as an Expert Witness

Erik Pakeiser, 1pm to 4pm, Developing a Force on Force Training Program

Claude Werner, 1pm-3pm, STOPP Strategy, Tactics and Options for Personal Protection

John Holschen and Gary Greco, 3pm-4pm, Video Debrief of Scenarios Conducted in the Shoot-House earlier

MED BAY
Caleb Causey, 8am to 10am, Tactical Medicine for EDC

Cecil Burch, 10am to Noon, Just Enough Ju-Jitsu

Larry Lindenman, 1pm to 4pm, Hand to Hand Defensive Skills for Women

PAPER RANGE (Live Fire)
Julie Thomas, 8am to 10am, Ladies Intro to Handguns, Level 1, 50 rounds

Lori Bigley and Lynn Givens, 10am to Noon, Ladies Level II, 100 rounds

Tom Givens, 1pm to 4pm, Fundamentals of the Defensive Shotgun, 75 rounds birdshot

Shoot-House
Craig Douglas, Southnarc, 8am to Noon, Experiential Learning Lab, Simunitions equipment and munitions

Covered Pistol Range
Tactical Pistol Match, all day
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SapperSteel

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Re: Rangemaster training
« Reply #4 on: December 21, 2016, 07:49:53 PM »
Hope you have some fun, Jhutch.  Looking forward to your after action report.

As always,

Sap

jhutch

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Re: Rangemaster training
« Reply #5 on: March 17, 2017, 10:08:03 PM »
End of day 1!  I took the combative pistol course 8-12 and the shoot-house hostage rescue exercise 1-5.  Tomorrow some classroom stuff - tough to choose a track.  I'll write more later, just having a beer at the hotel bar with a few people now.  Quite a cast.
Hutch
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Major Malfunction

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Re: Rangemaster training
« Reply #6 on: March 21, 2017, 07:45:29 AM »
Great! Have a good time - I'm eager to hear about your experiences.
Security cannot be achieved at the cost of freedom.

Our nation was founded by the courageous and the strong. Cowards didn't dare come, the weak didn't survive. But once the hard work was done, and the danger conquered... well, you see what happened.

jhutch

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Re: Rangemaster training
« Reply #7 on: March 21, 2017, 08:49:37 PM »
Here's the report (only Days 0 and 1 for now...)

Day 0 – I left home a bit apprehensive about flying with firearms, but was pleasantly surprised at how easy it was.  The American Airlines counter agent was a woman about 60 years old and when I said I was traveling with 2 firearms, she said, “I joined the NRA last year!  I really like them, but they’re relentless with their fundraising emails and phone calls.  I also got my concealed carry license last October!”  I simply had to sign a form stating that the firearms were unloaded, see below:  Image 1

I flew through Charlotte to Little Rock, AR and while standing in line for the plane from Charlotte to the land of the Clintons I noticed a two guys in front of me all dressed in black and one was wearing a Crossbreed Holster hat.  I asked them if they were going to TacCon17 and they both said yes.  Then two guys behind me in line introduced themselves, saying they were also on their way to TacCon.  We ended up talking  guns and training until we boarded, then all waited at the luggage belt for our bags.  It turns out that when you fly with firearms, they don’t come out on the belt.  An agent brings them out and you need to show ID to claim your bag – GREAT idea.   We were all staying at different hotels, so we split up then, and I grabbed an Uber to the Hilton Garden Inn in North Little Rock.

I had tried to ship ammo, but my local UPS asked what was in the box and when I say “small arms ammunition” he said I couldn’t ship from that location.  I’d have to take it to a UPS hub, which was about 10 miles away.  I was short on time that night, but luckily a guy, Ed, on the TacCon Facebook group page had said he was bringing ammo for sale, so I just ordered 500 rounds of 9mm from him and left my packaged ammo at home.

After getting to the hotel, I saw a message on the Facebook group saying a bunch were meeting for dinner at a local restaurant, including Ed with the Ammo, so I went and met them and got my ammo.  After a nice dinner and meeting 7 other attendees, I went back to my room and unpacked.  Here’s what that looked like:

By the way, I bought a Vaultek portable gun safe for this trip, since my “GunVault” safe is a piece of shit.  (I took both, but used the GunVault for magazines and the holsters.  That’s the GunVault shown above with 9mm cartridges in it.)  I REALLY like the Vaultek, but that’s another post all its own.

Day 1:  One of the guys at the restaurant the night before said I could ride to the range with him.  It’s really out in the bayou, so I highly doubt that an Uber or cab driver would have found it.  An elevated road through swamp land – it looks like something out of a horror movie.

Upon arrival, I signed in, got my ID badge and went to sign up for the first session:  “Intro to combative pistol” taught by John Hearne.  It was an intro course for sure, but I hadn’t shot for quite a while and could certainly use the back-to-basics refresher.  Apparently lots of other people felt the same way, since many late-comers were turned away.  A total of 24 of us were in that group, including Marty Hayes, President of ACLDN.  John Hearne is an excellent instructor, very knowledgeable, engaging and personable.

We teamed up in twos, and my partner ended up being a really nice guy named Steve Davis, who is the recently elected President of the Guns Save Life organization in Illinois.  Several instructors pitched in to help ensure safety and answer questions, which is where I met another great guy, Tim Reedy, who is an instructor out of Texas that looks a lot like a 45 year old Kris Kristofferson.  After a while I did Ok, considering how long it had been since I’d gone to the range – and that I’d only shot about 200 rounds through my new Glock 43.  I had 2 failures to feed out of about 100 rounds, and this problem again reared its head during my timed pistol match on Sunday.  I highly suspect the magazine extenders that I just bought and installed prior to attending.  I had bought Taran Tactical extensions, two each of plus-2 and plus-3 versions, and I may have used the wrong follower springs in two of them.  The springs are of slightly different lengths.  I’ll investigate that later this week.

The Intro to Combative Pistol went from 8-Noon, so after eating a lunch I’d packed, I attended the session by Claude Werner entitled, “S.T.O.P.P:  Strategy, Tactics and Options for Personal Protection”.  It was slow starting.  I thought that the first 30 minutes could easily have been compressed into 10 minutes without any loss of info, but then it picked up and got interesting.  A lot of the class focused on avoiding problem situations, the OODA loop and disrupting the attacker’s loop, common sense ways of parking to avoid becoming a victim, pre-attack indicators, knowing use of force statutes for where you’re traveling, making 3 right turns to determine if you’re being followed and a great hint of getting a wallet with a removable driver’s license + CCL sleeve that can be held above your head should you ever be involved in a defensive shooting.  (Criminals rarely hold ID cards above their head – so that reduces the risk of being shot by arriving law enforcement).  I’m sure there was more, but I wasn’t taking notes.

Immediately after that session, I attended “Defining the Threat” by Tom Givens.   Tom was my favorite speaker of the event.  He knows his stuff and has a really entertaining presenting style and way of talking (i.e., “When you hear people whining about something not being fair, it’s either a 3-year old or a democrat”).  Tom had some good insights into the sources for reliable and meaningful crime statistics when trying to truly define the threat for which an ordinary citizen should prepare.   He pointed out the discontinuation of the term “Attempted Murder” and the use instead of “Aggravated Assault”.  This trick by progressives makes the crime stats seem more palatable, so that the sheeple have a false sense of security.  He told several heart-wrenching stories of people that he knows that survived an aggravated assault, but whose lives were ruined.   He gave good and bad examples of data sources, focusing on those that are relevant to ordinary citizens with a CCL, not from sources such as LEOKA (Law Enforcement Officers Killed or Assaulted).  LEOs actively make contact with those people that likely have a problem with the law, and attacks typically occur after contact is made.  Ordinary citizens (should) avoid proactively making contacts with potential criminals – so LEO violent crime stats are not really relevant when trying to decide on a personal defense strategy and what places to avoid.  Much better are FBI, DEA and undercover agent statistics, since these people carry concealed and look much more like the ordinary citizen.  It was a very informative session.  Takeaways:  Walmart parking lots are currently the most dangerous place in America, followed by gas stations and ATMs.  Lots of criminals follow people home from shopping malls and assault them in their driveway.

Next up (for me) was “What Really Matters – Part 1” by Wayne Dobbs and Darryl Bolke.  Darryl is a huge bearded man with a shaved head and entertaining speaking style.  He was a SoCal LEO for 20 years and their SWAT firearms instructor and armorer.  Darryl assisted on the investigation of more than 75 officer involved shootings and interviewed many, many successful gun-fighters to determine what they did right.  He has a huge collection of police duty revolvers.  We got to see a slide presentation of the gruesome aftermath of several violent shooting incidents where the bad guy lost.   Darryl described each scenario and stressed the importance of accurate, sighted-shooting, with 2 to the body and one directly to the head being the desired outcome for the bad guy that attacks a cop. 

What Really Matters – Part 2” immediately followed part 1 and was held at the range.  Wayne Dobbs is an excellent marksman with a pistol and demonstrated several training regimens before taking 24 people through them.  Unfortunately for me, I had to hit the porta-john after part 1 and showed up too late to get in on the shooting – so I had to watch instead of participate.  Wayne was impressive, consistently shooting very close groupings of say, 5 shots in 5 seconds from 5 yards, etc.  Many times it was a half-dollar sized hole in the target bulls-eye.  That was the end of Day 1.  I’ll write up Days 2 and 3 later… (Day 3 was a blast, where I went through a shoot house with a paint-marking simunition Glock 19 to rescue my “niece” held hostage in her bedroom by an armed burglar and an accomplice).
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Major Malfunction

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Re: Rangemaster training
« Reply #8 on: March 22, 2017, 10:53:52 AM »
Interesting. I'm jealous.
Security cannot be achieved at the cost of freedom.

Our nation was founded by the courageous and the strong. Cowards didn't dare come, the weak didn't survive. But once the hard work was done, and the danger conquered... well, you see what happened.